‘Mythology, Madness, and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism’

October 2nd 2009 by Continuum

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Mythology, Madness and Laughter: Subjectivity in German Idealism explores some long neglected but crucial themes in German idealism. By applying idealistic theories of reflection and concrete subjectivity, including the problem of madness and everydayness in Hegel, this hugely important book aims to reinvigorate a philosophy of finitude and contingency, topics at the forefront of contemporary European philosophy.

Markus Gabriel was born in 1980 and studied in Heidelberg, Lisbon and New York. Since 2009 he has held the chair for Epistemology at the University of Bonn; and with this appointment he became Germany’s youngest philosophy professor. He is also the director of the International Center for Philosophy in Bonn. He has published a number of books and journal articles in German, including Der Mensch im Mythos (De Gruyter, 2006), and Das Absolute und die Welt in Schellings Freiheitsschrift (Bonn University Press, 2006).

Slavoj Žižek is a Hegelian philosopher and psychoanalytic social theorist. He is Senior Researcher at the Department of Philosophy, University of Ljubljana; Professor at the School of Law, Birkbeck, University of London; Distinguished Scholar at the Kyung Hee University, Seoul; and Visiting Professor at the German Department, New York University. His field of work comprises psychoanalytic theory, dialectical-materialist interpretations of German Idealism and Marxist critique of ideology. His more than thirty books in English have been widely translated. His latest publications include Like a Thief in Broad Daylight (Penguin/Allen 2018), Reading Marx (with Agon Hamza and Frank Ruda, Polity 2018), Incontinence of the Void (MIT Press 2017), and Lenin: Remembering, Repeating, and Working Through (Verso 2017).

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